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Military Divorce Archives

Choose the state in which you file for divorce wisely

If you research how to get a divorce without typing in any additional search terms, then you'll likely come across a lot of information mentioning how you're required to file for divorce in the state where you maintain legal residency. This rule of thumb doesn't necessarily apply to you if you're in the military or married to someone who is. Service members and their spouses often qualify to file for divorce in not just one, but three different states.

Child support and the military

Military service members and veterans in Washington and the rest of the United States are required to pay child support for their custodial and non-custodial children. The federal regulations pertaining to child support enhance state-level laws by ensuring that military members comply with payment.

Military divorces slowly dropping

Military couples in Washington might be less likely to divorce than in previous years. Divorce in the military has been on a slow decline in the last decade, and a 3% divorce rate in 2018 represented a 0.1% drop from the previous year. The rate is calculated over fiscal years by comparing how many divorces are reported by the end of the year to how many people are married at the start. However, it cannot be accurately compared to the national divorce rate because the two are calculated so differently. In 2016, the national divorce rate was 3.2%.

Child visitation for military parents

When one or both divorced parents of a child are members of the military, arranging child visitation can be a complicated matter. Just like non-military families, visitation for military members is established in family court through a custody agreement that's approved by a judge. These agreements need to adhere to the state law of Washington or wherever the family resides. When both parents stay in the same location, visitation can be structured or unstructured. Structured requires a strict schedule while unstructured allows some flexibility.

Military divorce rates declining slightly but remain very high

Americans who serve in the U.S. Military make substantial sacrifices for their country. In addition to risking death, many who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan have come home with permanent and life-changing injuries – both physical and psychological.

Things to consider during a military divorce

Ask any service member in Washington about their marriage and they will more than likely tell you that it’s a constant balancing act. Juggling family, friends, and a sense of duty to your country can be full-time jobs of their own. Throw in numerous deployments and long workdays and many will tell you that you have a recipe for disaster.

Air Force mother explains stresses of deployment on a family

Some families in Washington this month were particularly happy to celebrate Mother's Day this past weekend; especially if it offered even a small distraction from a divorce or separation.  For military families it may have been bittersweet though, especially in cases where one parent is deployed.  It's a stress some mother's say is difficult to go through but not impossible to bear.