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Posts tagged "Child Custody and Visitation"

Putting the kids first in a parenting schedule

Washington spouses who are going through divorce should understand that a parenting plan is meant to help children keep a healthy relationship with both households. Neither parent should attempt to undermine the other because they are angry about the divorce.

Custody and older children

When it comes to child custody cases, there are a lot of different factors that must be considered. Of course, courts will look at the relationships between children and their parents, the financial circumstances of parents and other factors that will help the court try to decide which arrangement would be in the best interests of a child. One factor that can play a role in custody cases which is sometimes overlooked is the age of children. If you are preparing for a custody case or are going through a bitter dispute with your child’s other parent, please look into issues related to your child’s age if they could impact your case.

Research shows that joint custody benefits children of all ages

Divorced couples with children in Washington often have differences of opinion over custody and visitation issues. Some may even believe that sole custody is best for the kids, especially infants and toddlers. However, joint custody is usually better for children of all ages. This is the main takeaway from a study published by a psychologist who analyzed research on various approaches to post-divorce parenting.

Late icon's daughter hopes rehab will bolster custody case

There may be many assumptions that people in Federal Way have about divorce proceedings that are ultimately untrue. One may be that family courts automatically assume mothers to be the ones best fit to raise their children, and thus custody hearings tend to favor them right from the outset. In reality, the court's primary motivation when issuing rulings in custody cases is the best interests of the children involved. There is a presumption that kids are most benefited from having both parents in their lives. Thus, joint custody may be the arrangement that courts favor. Yet parents must first prove that they are deserving of that. 

Child custody matters may be contentious

Some Washington couples seem to be able to work together despite their pending divorce while others disagree and contest seemingly every single detail. Cooperation can provide significant benefits to both parents in terms of a less costly process and a separation that is less stressful to all involved. Perhaps nowhere is this truer than in the arena of child custody, which can become extremely nasty and, if not reigned in, can be harmful to the children.

How does a judge determine a parenting plan?

If you are a parent who is going through a divorce, a major concern is probably who will get custody of your children. The state of Washington uses the term parenting plan instead of visitation or custody, and there are general factors that a judge typically considers before deciding on the best plan.

Handling the holidays after divorce

Ending a marriage can be among the most stressful events a person will go through in his or her life. The specific outcomes of Washington divorces vary on a case-by-case basis, but they also have many things in common. In cases where children are involved, the holidays can be an especially trying time. Divorced couples often have to deal with sending children back and forth to separate homes for holiday celebrations, which can lead to emotional situations and dilemmas.

Parallel parenting is an option for high conflict couples

Washington parents considering a split are generally prepared for animosity during the initial divorce or child custody proceedings. Conflict between parents is a major cause of stress for children who are already going through a dramatic reshaping of their world. The best-case scenario involves parents being able to put aside personal feelings to put focus on the best interests of the children in a collaborative co-parenting relationship. Unfortunately, that is not always possible. An alternative structure is a parallel parenting arrangement under which the parents communicate as little as possible and focus strictly on controlling their end of the arrangement. As with any parenting relationship, a parallel arrangement has its challenges.

Parents often struggle over child custody issues

When parents in Washington decide to divorce, child custody can be one of the most emotionally painful and logistically difficult issues. Both mothers and fathers often lament that they receive unfair treatment in family court on child custody issues. That's why the process often leads to a great deal of bitterness. This can be especially troubling when both parents will need to work together for years in the future for parenting issues related to the children.

Best way to deal with custody and the holidays

For many people in Washington, the holidays present the opportunity to celebrate and spend more time with family and friends. For newly-divorced parents, however, this time of the year can be extremely hard. It typically means spending less time with their children than normal and, if the parents cannot agree on how to divide time, it can also be stressful and infuriating.