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Posts tagged "military divorce"

Child visitation for military parents

When one or both divorced parents of a child are members of the military, arranging child visitation can be a complicated matter. Just like non-military families, visitation for military members is established in family court through a custody agreement that's approved by a judge. These agreements need to adhere to the state law of Washington or wherever the family resides. When both parents stay in the same location, visitation can be structured or unstructured. Structured requires a strict schedule while unstructured allows some flexibility.

Military benefits for spouses do not end with abandonment

The end of a relationship is traumatic, but yours may be more so if your service member spouse has abandoned you. The legal team at Clement Law Center has an in-depth knowledge of military family law, and we often provide advice to military spouses who find themselves in this position.

Miliarty families and telling your spouse about a divorce

For any couple, talking about a divorce can be incredibly difficult. For some, it may even seem downright impossible. For example, those who are married to a military member who is deployed, or are living overseas due to the military, may be especially worried about the impact that this announcement may have on their partner. Furthermore, some people who are involved in these types of relationships are already under an enormous amount of pressure due to the distance, stress and other challenges that some military families have to work through. As a result, it is essential to approach a military divorce properly.

Military divorce and kids

When it comes to divorce, there are many different issues which can affect children and this is especially true for people who work through a military divorce. For example, child custody matters can be complicated when one parent is in the military and the emotional impact of a divorce may be especially hard on some kids. Moreover, couples may be unsure of how property such as military pensions will be divided and the impact of a divorce can be very hard on someone who is deployed. If you have kids, it is crucial to make this process easier for them.

Handling emotions during a military divorce

Ending a marriage can be difficult for any couple, regardless of their circumstances. For some, however, divorce can be especially tough. For example, military couples may face a number of unique challenges as they work to end their marriage and in this write-up we will look into the emotional impact of military divorce and some strategies that people can take advantage of to reduce these negative emotions.

Filing for divorce with PTSD

On this blog, we have covered many facets of the divorce process. It is important to keep in mind that each family's case is unique and an individualized approach is important if you are preparing to split up with your spouse. Moreover, there are a number of considerations that are unique to military families who are working through the divorce process. For example, you or your spouse may be struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder, in which case you may need to be particularly cautious as you move through the divorce. There are different ways in which PTSD can complicate the end of a marriage, and it is important to be prepared.

Military Divorce And Custody In Washington

Your divorce is finally done and the final judgment has been filed. You have custody of your children, but the military is going to throw a monkey wrench into your plans because you know that your spouse is going to use a deployment against you to gain the custody you fought so hard for. Washington provides policy for these situations via RCW 26.09.260(1).

Relocation of a Parent and Child

Co-parenting after a divorce presents many challenges even when both parents live in the same area. However, if the custodial parent decides to move to a new city or state with the child, many difficult issues arise. The non-custodial parent will be unable to see the child as frequently as before. Travel is an added expense for both parties. The child is subjected to a major change that has the potential to greatly disrupt his or her life. For these reasons, many non-custodial parents file court proceedings to bar relocation if at all possible. The custodial parent sometimes has no choice but to move - for example, due to a job change or military orders. Having an excellent attorney often means the difference between a court order barring or allowing relocation. 

Military divorce rates declining slightly but remain very high

Americans who serve in the U.S. Military make substantial sacrifices for their country. In addition to risking death, many who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan have come home with permanent and life-changing injuries – both physical and psychological.

Things to consider during a military divorce

Ask any service member in Washington about their marriage and they will more than likely tell you that it’s a constant balancing act. Juggling family, friends, and a sense of duty to your country can be full-time jobs of their own. Throw in numerous deployments and long workdays and many will tell you that you have a recipe for disaster.